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Straight up, both of these platforms are good at what they do. In a fairly short period of time, Binance has become one of the most popular exchanges. The largest overall difference in comparing CoinMetro and Binance is that Binance operates primarily as an exchange, whereas CoinMetro’s exchange is one part of a much larger platform.

The Exchange

CoinMetro and Binance offer some similar features: both have their own unique in-house token. Binance has BNB, CoinMetro has XCM. Both platforms also have a token buyback program, where a percentage of profits are committed to repurchasing their respective tokens. In CoinMetro’s case, the buyback program is supported by revenue sharing with strategic partner FXPIG, a forex brokerage that has been operating since 2011 with established assets to back the program. Both CoinMetro and Binance burn a percentage of their tokens over a period of time as a way to bolster value through scarcity. Both tokens can be used to pay fees on the respective exchanges at a discount rate, which is awesome.

One really big difference: CoinMetro support direct fiat/crypto deposits and withdrawals, whereas Binance does not support fiat.

Trading Platform

As a trading platform, Binance offers a “Basic” and “Advanced” interface for exchanging currencies. Charting is decent on the Advanced interface, and there are some pretty good analysis tools available. CoinMetro’s charting is highly customizable, with options to view multiple time and price studies and plot graphical representations of orders and account activity using a number of web and mobile clients.

With Binance, Limit and Stop orders are supported by the Advanced interface, but Binance’s matching engine does not support currently more complex order types.

CoinMetro has a lot more options in terms of both standard and non-standard order types, including: Markets, Limits, Stops, Limit Stop Orders and OCO (One Cancels Other) orders, which are a combination of Stop and Limit orders on the same ticket, plus TIF (Time in Force) options, such as FOK (Fill or Kill), IOC (Immediate or Cancel), and GTC (Good till Cancelled).

CoinMetro also offers lending and leverage options, sort of like Poloniex or Bitmex, whereas Binance does not currently have these features.

Investment Tools

As an exchange, Binance provides a solid infrastructure. When it comes to offering investment opportunities beyond just buying and selling on a marketplace, CoinMetro has two pretty innovative models: ETCF’s (like ETF’s but for crypto), and TAM accounts, which let anybody partner up with a professional trader. Instead of making a ton of little trades to diversify, with CoinMetro’s ETCF’s you can diversify with one click into curated baskets of digital assets based on a bunch of different analytics ranging from industry to social media data.

Tools for ICO’s

When it comes to ICO’s, Binance’s Lab serves as a technology incubator geared towards early stage projects, and its LaunchPad offers some features for ICO offerings. As Binance develops, it seems like these services might expand, but for now they appear pretty limited based on their web presence.

CoinMetro’s ICO Express platform is a complete, turnkey ICO framework designed to provide a solution for vetted ICO’s to issue tokens, smart contracts, and launch projects atop our blockchain infrastructure. Successful ICO’s launched via the CoinMetro platform will have their tokens listed on the CoinMetro exchange immediately as liquid and tradable.

TL/DR:

Both platforms are good at what they do. Binance works well as an exchange. CoinMetro also offers an exchange, along with a whole lot of other pretty awesome features like being able to deposit/withdraw fiat, crypto ETF’s, and a customizable trading interface.

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